K-12 Career and Technical Education Home PageK-12 Career and Technical Education
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PUBLIC ANNOUNCMENT

The Grand Blanc Community Schools is pleased to offer Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs to its high school students. Programs include:

               -Automotive Technology

               -Business Management Technology

               -Child Psychology/Parenting

               -Construction/Carpentry

               -Education

               -Finance and Accounting

               -Foods and Nutrition

               -Life Management

               -Marketing

               -Medical Occupations

               -Multimedia: Video and Web Production

               -Personal Living

               -Pre-Engineering/Drafting & C.A.D.

               -Computer Programming

 

For more information on GBCS CTE programs, please contact Jennifer Hammond, High School Principal, at (810) 591-6931.

Admissions Criteria: Grand Blanc High School CTE courses are open to all GBHS 10th – 12th grade (some programs open to 9th grade) students without regard to race, color, national origin, gender, age, a lack of English language skills, or disability.  If you need the CTE information in another language other than English, please contact our office.  Si quisiera tener la información de CTE en español, por favor, llame nuestra oficina.

The Grand Blanc Board of Education is committed to a policy of non-discrimination in relation to race, color, sex, age, religion, height, weight, marital status, disability and national origin. The Board appointed coordinator for all concerns and complaints for issues relating to Title IX, Section 504, the Age Discrimination Act and Title II is: Director of Personnel, Administration Building, 11920 S Saginaw, Grand Blanc, MI 48439, 810-591-6001.


To view a full page version of this announcment, please click here


Announcements
PUBLIC ANNOUNCMENT

The Grand Blanc Community Schools is pleased to offer Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs to its high school students. Programs include:

               -Automotive Technology

               -Business Management Technology

               -Child Psychology/Parenting

               -Construction/Carpentry

               -Education

               -Finance and Accounting

               -Foods and Nutrition

               -Life Management

               -Marketing

               -Medical Occupations

               -Multimedia: Video and Web Production

               -Personal Living

               -Pre-Engineering/Drafting & C.A.D.

               -Computer Programming

 

For more information on GBCS CTE programs, please contact Jennifer Hammond, High School Principal, at (810) 591-6931.

Admissions Criteria: Grand Blanc High School CTE courses are open to all GBHS 10th – 12th grade (some programs open to 9th grade) students without regard to race, color, national origin, gender, age, a lack of English language skills, or disability.  If you need the CTE information in another language other than English, please contact our office.  Si quisiera tener la información de CTE en español, por favor, llame nuestra oficina.

The Grand Blanc Board of Education is committed to a policy of non-discrimination in relation to race, color, sex, age, religion, height, weight, marital status, disability and national origin. The Board appointed coordinator for all concerns and complaints for issues relating to Title IX, Section 504, the Age Discrimination Act and Title II is: Director of Personnel, Administration Building, 11920 S Saginaw, Grand Blanc, MI 48439, 810-591-6001.


To view a full page version of this announcment, please click here


Integrate Academic, Technical and Employability Skills with CTE
In the real world:

• Four of every 10 new college students, including half of those at two-year institutions, take remedial courses, and many employers comment on the inadequate preparation of high school graduates.

• The skilled trades are the hardest jobs to fill in the United States, with recent data citing 550,000 jobs open in the trade, transportation and utilities sector and 246,000 jobs open in manufacturing.

• Of the 46.8 million job openings created by 2013, 30 percent will require some college or a two-year associate degree.

• More than 70% of secondary CTE concentrators pursued post-secondary education shortly after high school.

• 81% of dropouts say relevant, real-world learning opportunities would have kept them in high school.

For more information, click here


Deputy Secretary of Education Tony Miller: "Coordinate With Business to Build Needed Job Skills"

In honor of Career and Technical Education (CTE) Month, I want to emphasize the importance of building high-quality CTE programs that focus on meeting the needs of the 21st century economy. We know that strong CTE programs require collaboration among secondary and postsecondary education institutions, employers, industry, and other partners, for example labor unions and trade organizations. We also must ensure that these programs provide students and workers with skills that are adaptable to the needs of local and regional economies.

The skills that an individual needs to work in a variety of industries are constantly evolving. The Bureau of Labor Statistics recently reported that the hardest jobs to fill are those requiring “middle skills,” that is, those jobs that require education beyond a high school diploma but do not necessarily require a bachelor’s degree. Middle-skill jobs include occupations such as software engineers, aircraft mechanics, and electricians. Jobs that previously could be filled by workers with no more than a high school degree now require more specialized training—for example, many manufacturing jobs require knowledge and skills in computing technology. We also know that the current demand for workers with associate degrees, particularly in fields like health care, computing, and business services, is outpacing the demand for those with bachelor’s degrees.

Therefore we must keep working to provide programs of study at all levels—from K-12 through advanced degree programs—that maintain challenging academic standards tailored to local, regional, and future workforce needs. We should expand opportunities for secondary school students to participate in dual or concurrent enrollment programs, create challenging work experiences for students through apprenticeships and industry-based training, and ensure that educational content is engaging for students in the fields where they will find jobs available upon graduation.

Thank you very much for your efforts to build, support, and highlight high-quality CTE programs that meet the needs of tomorrow’s economy.


CTE: LEARNING THAT WORKS
Discussion Topics
Contacts
+ CTE Secretary, Lucy Shinabarger
Click on name to see details.