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Videos and Podcasts
CTE Resources
Announcements
Awesome Summer Opportunities…
Baker College of Flint will host its annual summer engineering opportunities for both middle and high school students throughout the month of July.

Through “Explore Engineering and Technology”, high school students entering grades 9-12 in the fall will experience a week-long integration into the high demand field of engineering, including mechanical, civil, industrial, and electrical. Students will also be exposed to architecture, CAD, computer science, and photonics. “Explore Engineering and Technology” will run July 6-10, 2015, from 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Middle school students, entering grades 6-8 in the fall, are eligible for the “Robotics and Photonics” component of the camp which includes an exciting hands-on to basic robotic and electronic fundamentals used in the field of engineering as well as competitive high school robotics teams. “Robotics and Photonics” will run July 20-24, 2015, from 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Interested students should contact Baker College of Flint Admissions Office at 810-766-4000.
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Articulation = Free College Credit

Are you looking to gain workplace skills and build your resume?
Work-based learning is an opportunity available to students that previously have or are currently participating in Career and Technical Education (CTE) courses. We will be interviewing students to serve as interns in office clerical positions for second semester placements. Interns serve in un-paid positions for either a semester or full year term within the school and would report to their intern job placement instead of one of their elective courses. This type of work-based learning provides great experience for students that are looking to build their job skills and resumes.

Work-based learning opportunities (jobs/internships that relate to your EDP career goals) are also available for elective credit through external placements in local businesses for CTE and Non-CTE students.

Interested students should contact the Grand Blanc Placement Coordinator, Mr. Wiltse for additional details: wwiltse@GrandBlancSchools.org
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FREE ONLINE TUTORING AVAILABLE TO GBHS STUDENTS
Through the University of Michigan, GBHS students now have access to free online tutoring services in Math, Science, English, Writing, and more. For more information including how to sign up, please click here.
Integrate Academic, Technical and Employability Skills with CTE
In the real world:

• Four of every 10 new college students, including half of those at two-year institutions, take remedial courses, and many employers comment on the inadequate preparation of high school graduates.

• The skilled trades are the hardest jobs to fill in the United States, with recent data citing 550,000 jobs open in the trade, transportation and utilities sector and 246,000 jobs open in manufacturing.

• Of the 46.8 million job openings created by 2013, 30 percent will require some college or a two-year associate degree.

• More than 70% of secondary CTE concentrators pursued post-secondary education shortly after high school.

• 81% of dropouts say relevant, real-world learning opportunities would have kept them in high school.

For more information, click here​

Deputy Secretary of Education Tony Miller: "Coordinate With Business to Build Needed Job Skills"
In honor of Career and Technical Education (CTE) Month, I want to emphasize the importance of building high-quality CTE programs that focus on meeting the needs of the 21st century economy. We know that strong CTE programs require collaboration among secondary and postsecondary education institutions, employers, industry, and other partners, for example labor unions and trade organizations. We also must ensure that these programs provide students and workers with skills that are adaptable to the needs of local and regional economies.

The skills that an individual needs to work in a variety of industries are constantly evolving. The Bureau of Labor Statistics recently reported that the hardest jobs to fill are those requiring “middle skills,” that is, those jobs that require education beyond a high school diploma but do not necessarily require a bachelor’s degree. Middle-skill jobs include occupations such as software engineers, aircraft mechanics, and electricians. Jobs that previously could be filled by workers with no more than a high school degree now require more specialized training—for example, many manufacturing jobs require knowledge and skills in computing technology. We also know that the current demand for workers with associate degrees, particularly in fields like health care, computing, and business services, is outpacing the demand for those with bachelor’s degrees.

Therefore we must keep working to provide programs of study at all levels—from K-12 through advanced degree programs—that maintain challenging academic standards tailored to local, regional, and future workforce needs. We should expand opportunities for secondary school students to participate in dual or concurrent enrollment programs, create challenging work experiences for students through apprenticeships and industry-based training, and ensure that educational content is engaging for students in the fields where they will find jobs available upon graduation.

Thank you very much for your efforts to build, support, and highlight high-quality CTE programs that meet the needs of tomorrow’s economy.
CTE: LEARNING THAT WORKS
Discussion Topics
Contacts
+ Career Specialist, Janet Roberts
+ CTE Secretary, Lucy Shinabarger
Click on name to see details.